Watching

What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money. But it's not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose. Behavioural economist Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes towards meaning in our work.

Alain de Botton examines our ideas of success and failure, and questions the assumptions underlying these two judgments. Is success always earned? Is failure? He makes an eloquent and witty case for ways to find true pleasure in our work.

Brené Brown studies human connection--our ability to empathize, belong and love. In a poignant, funny talk, she shares a deep insight from her research, that those who experience love and belonging in their lives feel worthy of love and belonging. 

Our world prizes extroverts, but Susan Cain makes the case for the superpower of introversion.

The Creative Brain: How Insight Works. A brilliantly entertaining and informative BBC Horizon documentary follows scientists studying the mental processes involved in creativity.

Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi asks, "What makes a life worth living?" Noting that money cannot make us happy, he looks to those who find pleasure and lasting satisfaction in activities that bring about a state of "flow".

Most people instinctively avoid conflict, but as Margaret Heffernan shows us, good disagreement is central to progress. She illustrates (sometimes counterintuitively) how the best partners aren’t echo chambers -- and how great research teams, relationships and businesses allow people to deeply disagree.

What's the secret to unlocking the creativity hidden inside your daily work, and giving every great idea a chance? Harvard professor Linda Hill, co-author of "Collective Genius," has studied some of the world's most creative companies to come up with a set of tools and tactics to keep great ideas flowing -- from everyone in the company, not just the designated "creatives."

Nobel laureate and founder of behavioural economics Daniel Kahneman reveals how our "experiencing selves" and our "remembering selves" perceive happiness differently. This new insight has profound implications for economics, public policy and our own self-awareness.

Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don't: traditional rewards aren't always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories--and maybe a way forward.

Ken Robinson believes that everyone is born with extraordinary creative capability and finding purpose is essential to knowing who we really are.

What makes a great leader? Management theorist Simon Sinek suggests, it’s someone who makes their employees feel secure, who draws staffers into a circle of trust. But creating trust and safety — especially in an uneven economy — means taking on big responsibility. He also has a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership -- starting with a golden circle and the question: "Why?"